The Lubec Scribbler   1 comment

At Hamilton CoveHerein, a shameless purveyor of utterly incomprehensible gibberish presents his tripe to the adoring world.

Each of us, as writers, create our own corpus, and we live and die within that world, limited or broad as we choose to make it.  So far, my extended universe is contained within a dozen or so works.  One is a trilogy spanning nearly twenty years, another descends into the private world of a woman who believes there is more to be seen than she knows, but can’t seem to find it.  This latter work takes place over a chaotic six months but covers several lifetimes.

My works do not – for the most part – continue from one story to another with the same cast. A few supporting characters surface in different stories, such as the glamorous black-widow Adrienne Mitchell, who I would not want to meet in real life.

Intimacy is an integral part of a committed relationship, and so it is with many of the denizens of my universe.  Their loving is implicit, as laden with symbolism as it is for the rest of us, and they (for the most part) are faithful to each other.  The intent is not to be titillating or erotic, but to be illustrative of their innermost feelings for each other.  Take away the sex, and all that’s left is a hollow shell.

 

My works so far: (all available on Amazon, and at selected retailers.)

 

Buster Loman   Political intrigue in a small town, in the era of Trump. Loyalties are challenged, assumptions shattered, and all in the name of progress. But whose definition of “progress” will prevail?

Cold Harbor   Set partially in the Civil War, and also in modern-day Lubec, Maine. The portions involving the Sixth Maine Volunteer Regiment (a very real outfit, with well-earned honors) have been carefully researched. How does inter-generational memory work? Can it be passed subconsciously? Do spirits live on battlefields? Selected research materials have been collected into Filling in the Gaps, hopefully allowing future researchers the opportunity to benefit from some seldom-seen documents.

Voices   Five short stories, each based on an Old Testament woman. Do not expect a theologically approved interpretation. The women include (in order of appearance) Esther, Jezebel, Athaliah, Bathsheba, and Ya’el.

Belt of Orion and Alnilam      Two novellas in one cover – what could be better? Island Girl has a secret, one that she doesn’t fully comprehend. When her daughter’s issues lead her back to where she started, her friends – who thought her dead – each possess one piece of the puzzle, and life begins anew.

Bridge to Someday  Delsey Roberts is scarred, but she perseveres, sometimes despite herself.  Her world changes when she meets Harvey Jackman; brilliant, clueless, handsome, a little rumpled.  He is driven to success, and his single mindedness sets her up for disaster.  She lives to sorely regret the consequences of her own impulsive act, which includes losing the only man who ever truly loved her.

Delsey explores the life-arc of both Delsey and Harvey, and the circle is ultimately closed.  Or is it?  Their paths nearly collide, repeatedly, yet each remains unaware of the other’s proximity, separated by only a short distance and in some cases, intertwined.  Both know triumph and tragedy, but the lessons they learn are not the same.

Johnson Canyon delves into the psyche of two who have been brought back into contact but who cannot escape their own fears, their own memories, and their own persona.  These forces both pull  them together and keep them apart.  The thread of life weaves a tapestry, moving through the worlds of both the executive suite and professional ballet as plans are repeatedly made then dashed, bringing Delsey to confront her deepest fears and Harvey to question his fondest hopes.  This is the third, and concluding, member of the Delsey Trilogy.

Neap Tide looks into the heart of Cecelia Fontana, a proper lady from Boston who believes that the world of her youth is shallow and lacks commitment.  She adopts a new world, expecting to find things better, but never feels accepted by those already there.  We who live in tidal areas know the Spring Tide as that time when the sun and the moon conspire to drive the high tide and the low tide to their respective maximum and minimum.  The Neap Tide is the opposite of that, it occurs when the highs are low and the lows are high; once reached it immediately reverses itself and the differences again diverge.  As in the natural world, sometimes we are close to each other, and sometimes that separation leaves us adrift.

Monument Lot  What is the nature of madness?  Set in Lubec ME and also Bala Cynwyd, PA, a Very Normal Person brushes with a madman, and wrestles with the meaning of a mystery.  Talking statues?  Ask Clancy, he’ll know.

Murphy’s Revisited     Unabashedly erotic, this series of inter-related short stories spans as much of the hetero-sexual rainbow as could be crammed into a single volume. From the mythical Hell’s Kitchen bar to the towers of academia the characters explore each other – and themselves.

Mowry Beach    An autobiographical sketch, from the author’s earliest recollections until the very instant that his life was changed forever.  Like Murphy’s, not a children’s book.  It includes sex, drugs, sex with drugs, death, and a few other nasties.  Every bit of it is true, even The Bridesmaid’s Revenge.  Set first in the Cold War fifties, then the Sixties of Viet Nam, concluding in the early Seventies. The Fourth Edition is underway; expect it in early 2018.

Stay tuned!

Posted May 2, 2011 by JD Rule

One response to The Lubec Scribbler

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  1. All stories need a setting, else they lack any pretense of context. My first series, the Delsey trilogy, was set in New York City, with side trips to Cape Cod, San Francisco, Death Valley, and Ireland. Even a ski trip and sailboat race thrown in, just for good measure.

    Neap Tide is set in Down East Maine, but more properly is set in the head – and heart – of the lead character. Can a woman who grew up (maybe a little too quickly) in Boston learn to love the land that her husband is firmly rooted to, and in fact is a part of? What does she gain in the process – and what does she lose?

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